The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is banning flavored e-cigarette cartridges.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is banning flavored e-cigarette cartridges. This is part of a plan to stop young people from getting addicted to nicotine.

The FDA announced the new rule on Monday. Starting in 2021, only tobacco and menthol flavors will be allowed in e-cigarettes.

There are over 7,000 different flavor options for vaping products, including cotton candy and bubble gum. The FDA says these flavors appeal especially to teenagers and children, who often don't realize that vaping can cause harm to their health.

"The FDA's actions represent a notable step forward in protecting the public health," said Mitch Zeller, director of the Center for Tobacco Products at the FDA. "Young people are particularly vulnerable to taking up nicotine addiction with e-cigarettes."

The FDA also wants to ban flavored cigars because they attract young people as well. The restrictions would apply only to e-cigarettes sold in stores or online — not ones made by hand or sold at gas stations or convenience stores.

The ban does not include menthol or tobacco f The ban does not include menthol or tobacco flavored cartridges.

cigarettes, which will take effect on December 1. The ban was announced in a press release from the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which says it's "necessary to protect public health by ensuring that electronic cigarettes do not undermine the progress we have made in reducing youth smoking."

The ban applies to both flavored and unflavored e-cigarettes, but does not include menthol or tobacco flavored cartridges. The city says it is working with manufacturers to remove these products from store shelves.

The New York Times reports that the ban is meant to "protect children from becoming addicted to nicotine" and prevent adults from using them as an alternative to smoking traditional cigarettes. It also bans advertising of e-cigarettes near schools and recreational facilities that are frequented by children under 18 years old.lavored cartridges.

The ban does not include open tank devices like the Juul.

The FDA ban on e-cigarettes and other vaping products doesn't take effect until 2021, but many local governments are already implementing their own bans.

The Food and Drug Administration announced a sweeping ban on all tobacco products that have not been approved by the agency in April. This includes pretty much every electronic cigarette on the market except for one manufacturer's product, JUUL. The ban does not include open tank devices like the Juul.

Some cities have already banned e-cigarettes and other vaping products before the FDA ban goes into effect in 2021.

Chicago became one of the first cities to implement a ban when it passed an ordinance prohibiting "the use of electronic smoking devices in city parks, playgrounds, beaches, sidewalks and other public spaces." The city said it is "committed to protecting our communities from harmful second-hand smoke exposure."

New York City also implemented a temporary ban on e-cigarettes in public places such as parks and beaches back in May. Los Angeles followed suit by banning e-cigarettes from public spaces last month.

Adult smokers who use the banned cartridges won't be able to buy them from convenience stores, vape shops, gas stations and other retail outlets.

The Florida Department of Health has announced a ban on electronic cigarettes that contain nicotine.

The temporary ban will go into effect July 1 and last until Oct. 31, 2020.

Adult smokers who use the banned cartridges won't be able to buy them from convenience stores, vape shops, gas stations and other retail outlets. They'll have to look for them in other places such as online retailers or grocery stores.

It's unclear how much of an impact the ban will have on businesses that sell e-cigarettes but some companies say it could put them out of business.

The health department says it wants to protect children from vaping products that contain nicotine and other harmful chemicals. The agency also says it wants to prevent people from using tobacco products like cigarettes or cigars while they're waiting for their first appointment with a doctor or nurse practitioner at a state-funded clinic or hospital.